Mañapë

Also called Black Peji.

It is used as a purgative similar to the renewals. 

The long root is harvested, and they say that depending on how long it takes you equals how lazy you are. Once harvested, you rasp off the root bark. Typically you need to harvest quite a few plants depending on how large they are. This is then added to a big pot of water and brought to a boil and cooked at high heat for two hours. Then at 3am everyone gets up and drinks as many gourds as possible.

It is said to cleanse the blood, liver, any parasites and rids one of laziness.

Yoco

 

Guarana

Paullinia cupana

Sapindaceae

The celestial beings of Yoco-pai, or gente yoco viviente, embody the yoco and protect the Secoya.

Traditionally drunk in the early morning for a time to teach lessons, values, and ancestral knowledge to the young boys. Also for increased focused energy to weave hammocks and work in the jungle. 

Shared as the first thing drunk after ceremony to seal in the designs/visions.

They rasp about 6-10 inches of the stem into a small gourd and mix with water. This creates a cloudy brownish bitter brew.

The bark contain caffeine and theobromine.

Suppresses hunger and supplies stimulation to the muscles.

Medicinally used against fever, nausea, and vomiting. In larger dosages it can be an anti-malarial febrifuge and useful in treatment of a bilious disease.

Calamchoe

Hoja de Aire

Pinincilina Amazonica

Traditionally pulverized to extract the liquid, then two drops in the ears to treat infections.

Can treat bronchitis and congestion by mixing together with garlic vine. Cook together in water with ginger, reduce volume by half and drink one half cup.

Reduces flu like symptoms.

​Ñata Kërë

Plants alivia dollar de congo

Analgesic

Use the stem, mash until juicy and apply to bug bite.  Especially good for ant bites.

Mashed with Äi Nuni then add the juices to water. This can also help treat the bite.

Ayahuma

Couroupita guianenses

Cannonball Tree

The tree has reddish brown fruits that look like cannonballs hanging around the trunk area and the branches.

Uses:

         - Bark treats common colds and stomach upset

         - Young leaves are chewed to treat toothache

         - Mixing the fruit and bark for reducing                               inflammation and muscular pain

         - Fruit is used topically for skin conditions and                   disinfect wounds, as they are antibacterial and               anti-fungal 

Spiritually:

Helps us recover from emotional shocks and release past traumas due to the grounding strength it offers. It can also help move one into the heart instead of being stuck in the mind. 

Bobinsana

Calliandra angustifolia

Uses:

          -Decoction of its roots increase energy levels and                   improve strength           

          - Tincture of its bark is for arthritis, rheumatism,                       musculoskeletal pains, edema/oedema and

             uterine disorders

          - The bark is grated into baths to combat colds and                chills

 

Spiritually:

Bobinsana has gentle heart-opening qualities and teaches self love.  Opens the voice, helps with stability during changes

Ujajai

Chiric Sanango

Uses:

          - Tincture the stem to use topically               for muscle pain

          - The root for colds and arthritis

          - Use with extreme caution                             internally

Spiritually:

           - Cultivates a higher sense of self                 and confidence. It aids in                             emotional healing and provides a               greater sense of mental clarity.

Oco Mana

Traditionally used as a perfume.

 

Cooked with Achote to make face paint.

Worn on the wrists during ceremony. 

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